EARTHQUAKES IN OKLAHOMA

Earthquake Preparedness

Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management

Earthquake Safety 

Learn what steps you and your family can take to prepare for earthquakes

Information provided by http://earthquakecountry.org a project of the Southern California Earthquake Center at the University of Southern California (USC)

PREPARE

Before an earthquake we recommend these four steps that will make you, your family, or your workplace better prepared to survive and recover quickly:

Step 1:
Secure your space by identifying hazards and securing moveable items.
Step 2:
Plan to be safe by creating a disaster plan and deciding how you will communicate in an emergency.
Step 3:
Organize disaster supplies in convenient locations.
Step 4:
Minimize financial hardship by organizing important documents, strengthening your property, and considering insurance.

SURVIVE AND RECOVER

During an earthquake, and immediately after, is when your level of preparedness will make a difference in how you and others survive and can respond to emergencies:

Step 5:
Drop, Cover, and Hold On when the earth shakes.
Step 6:
Improve safety after earthquakes by evacuating if necessary, helping the injured, and preventing further injuries or damage.

After the immediate threat of the earthquake has passed, your level of preparedness will determine your quality of life in the weeks and months that follow:

Step 7:
Reconnect and Restore
Restore daily life by reconnecting with others, repairing damage, and rebuilding community.

Download the Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety.pdf

WHY DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON?

http://www.earthquakecountry.org/dropcoverholdon

Federal, state, and local emergency management experts and other official preparedness organizations all agree that “Drop, Cover, and Hold On” is the appropriate action to reduce injury and death during earthquakes.

    • If you are inside a building, move no more than a few steps, then Drop, Cover and Hold On:
      • DROP to the ground (before the earthquake drops you!),
      • Take COVER by getting under a sturdy desk or table, and
      • HOLD ON to it until the shaking stops.

      Stay indoors till the shaking stops and you are sure it is safe to exit. In most buildings in the U.S. you are safer if you stay where you are until the shaking stops.

    • If you are outdoors when the shaking starts, you should find a clear spot away from buildings, trees, streetlights, and power lines, then Drop, Cover and Hold On. Stay there until the shaking stops.
  • If you are driving, pull over to a clear location, stop and stay there with your seatbelt fastened until the shaking stops. Once the shaking stops, proceed with caution and avoid bridges or ramps that might have been damaged.

WHAT RESCUERS AND EXPERTS *DO NOT* RECOMMEND YOU DO DURING AN EARTHQUAKE

Based on years of research about how people are injured or killed during earthquakes, and the experiences of U.S. and international search and rescue teams, these two actions are not recommended to protect yourself during earthquakes:

DO NOT run outside or to other rooms during shaking: The area near the exterior walls of a building is the most dangerous place to be. Windows, facades and architectural details are often the first parts of the building to collapse. To stay away from this danger zone, stay inside if you are inside and outside if you are outside. Also, shaking can be so strong that you will not be able to move far without falling down, and objects may fall or be thrown at you that you do not expect. Injuries can be avoided if you drop to the ground before the earthquake drops you.

DO NOT stand in a doorway: An enduring earthquake image of California is a collapsed adobe home with the door frame as the only standing part. From this came our belief that a doorway is the safest place to be during an earthquake. True- if you live in an old, unreinforced adobe house or some older woodframe houses. In modern houses, doorways are no stronger than any other part of the house, and the doorway does not protect you from the most likely source of injury- falling or flying objects. You also may not be able to brace yourself in the door during strong shaking. You are safer under a table.

Prepare for earthquakes by participating in the Great Central U.S. Shake Out at 10:19 a.m on Thursday October 19, 2017

Millions of people worldwide will practice how to Drop, Cover, and Hold On at 10:19 a.m. on October 19, 2017 during Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills!

Why should you participate?

We all must get better prepared for major earthquakes, and practice how to protect ourselves when they happen. The purpose of the ShakeOut is to help people and organizations do both. You could be anywhere when an earthquake strikes: at home, at work, at school or even on vacation.

What we do now will determine our quality of life after our next big earthquake. Are you prepared to survive and recover quickly?

The Great Central U.S. ShakeOut is an annual opportunity to practice how to be safer during big earthquakes: “Drop, Cover and Hold On.” The ShakeOut has also been organized to encourage you, your community, your school, or your organization to review and update emergency preparedness plans and supplies, and to secure your space in order to prevent damage and injuries.

Registration totals from Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills across the U.S. are also included inAmerica’s PrepareAthon! participation totals.

Learn more below, or read answers to frequently asked questions.

Benefits

Register today so that you or your organization will:

  • Be counted in the largest-ever earthquake drill in Central U.S.!
  • Be listed with other participants in your area (Optional)
  • Be an example that motivates others to participate & prepare
  • Be updated with ShakeOut news and preparedness tips
  • Have peace of mind that you, your family, your co-workers and millions of others will be better prepared to survive and recover quickly from our next big earthquake!

Additional information on how to prepare yourself and family for earthquakes

State of Oklahoma 

OKSTRONG.OK.GOV

Oklahoma Department of Health Tips to Avoid Injury and Illness During a Power Outage

Non-Profits 

American Red Cross

American Red Cross Mobile App 

Federal 

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and FEMA

FEMA

FEMA For Kids — Earthquakes

Ready.gov